WZ Europe Continues to Grow

Over the last several years Wicklander-Zulawski & Associates (WZ) has taken its “Non-Confrontational Interview” concept and theories outside of North America to all corners of the world.  In fact, in the last year I personally have provided training on five different continents!  My travels and training courses have taken me to some exotic locations including Lagos, Dominican, El Salvador, Johannesburg, Washington DC, Manila, Dubai, Kabul, Los Angeles, Toronto, Vancouver, Tokyo, Hong Kong, London, Chicago, Amsterdam, Dublin, and a recent trip to Macau, China.  The demand for non-confrontational interview techniques is growing exponentially!

Since 2010 my travels and training have brought me to UK and Europe on a regular basis, and I’ve had the pleasure of delivering several courses for WZ EU within the UK with the help of Cardinal Security.  During that timeframe WZ EU has provided training to more than 800 delegates representing more than 100 different organizations.  This growing trend has created the need for a greater WZ presence in Europe.  So I’ve decided to give up the NFL and American Football for The Premiership and ‘proper football’ and settle just north of London for the next year.  I now call England my home.

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The Bearer of Many Hats…The Not So Secret Life of Professional HR/ER

Think being in Human Resources or Employee Relations isn’t funny?  Think again.

Check out Wicklander-Zulawski & Associates’ speaker Brett Ward, CFI as he gives us his take on the numerous hats HR/ER professionals wear on a daily basis.

“Greetings from 42,000 feet friends and colleagues…..

Gliding through my home away from home (the clouds) towards to the next assignment which this week happens to be a contract for a group consisting of Human Resources, Employee Relations, Ethics Officers and General Counsel for one of our Department of Defense contractors.

Typically, when I’m sitting in my hotel room working late into the evening feeling sorry for myself because of an overflowing platter, all it takes is to spend three days with a team of Human Resources professionals to remember the grass is hardly (never) ever greener on the other side.    We at Wicklander-Zulawski & Associates (WZ) are certainly the bearer of many hats:  Investigator, Consultant, Sales Person, Author,  Antagonizer (ok this one’s just me), Travel Coordinator, Referee, Psychologist (for each other) and the occasional Professional Speaker in our “spare time.”  But just a handful of hours with this group and I feel guilty about the half dozen or so knives I’m juggling at any one time.  I have significant moments of clarity occasionally when around certain industries that make me thank the good Lord my professional window of opportunity came in the form of a consultant.  You know, where I can do my thing and sneak off stage-left knowing what was left in my wake will be dealt with tomorrow morning by someone other than yours truly (“You’re welcome.” Ok, now that was not a nice gesture, very unlike you and non-”HRish”).  I started thinking of just how many hats folks in the professional HR/ER world deal with on a daily basis and it quickly became a high figure.  Know that there are other professionals out there that do recognize the mountains faced by your genre, understand the challenges of it, and are grateful for those that have the internal fortitude to take it on.

Thought we’d discuss a few…..

Generational Expert

When first “asked” (cough, cough – threatened) if I would be willing to blog for WZ, my response was, “Can you please use that word in a complete sentence, and are there any other pronunciations out there for it?”

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WZ President/CEO Shane Sturman, CFI, CPP Takes the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Of course, Shane took the ice bucket challenge but also donated to a worthy cause!  #StampOutALS

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Skilled Interviewers Only: “The Walk & Talk” Method

This article discusses a theory and approach to a modified form of general loss interviews.  Before making any practical use of this theory please partner with your respective supervisor and decision- makers at your company to ensure it complies with their guidelines.  This is an approach that takes a skilled, experienced interviewer to maneuver through the conversations appropriately.

We have so many resources nowadays to help us identify internal theft or dishonesty.  Now we see IP cameras, remote monitoring, exception reporting, biometrics and other technology that provides us with alerts and reports pointing us to who the bad guys are in our company.  However, regardless of what technology is out there; sometimes the best resources to identify issues are the employees themselves.  They are a wealth of information; anything from knowing who is dating whom or which employee just got a DWI and is in some serious financial trouble.  Our employees can provide us with invaluable information initiating an otherwise vague investigation.

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7 Danger Signs of a False Confession

Protect the Innocent

Protect the Innocent

A false confession is an admission of guilt in which the confessor is not responsible for the crime.  The Innocence Project states that “in about 25% of DNA exoneration cases, innocent defendants made incriminating statements, delivered outright confessions or pled guilty.”  They further state, “these cases show that confessions are not always prompted by internal knowledge or actual guilt, but are sometimes motivated by external influences.”

 

There are three categories of false confessions:

  • Voluntary false confessions are given freely.  Sometimes they do so to cover for the person responsible, or to gain attention.
  • Compliant false confessions are given to avoid stressful situations, avoid punishment, or gain an implied or promised reward.  Sometimes people confess to escape what feels like a helpless situation.
  • Internalized false confessions are those in which the person actually believes they committed the act.

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5 Most Common Fears that Spark Denials

It would be hard for any of us to imagine the many different fears or the strength of those fears a guilty subject must have during a well-planned interrogation. I think it would be very rare for a subject to have just one fear. Although there is probably one fear they are focused on most, I believe an interrogator
must plan on dealing with multiple fears. It must be noted that the fears a subject has during a business-related interrogation can be much different than during a police custodial interrogation. First, I will discuss the five most common fears during a business-related interrogation. Then, I will show the difference in the order and cause of the change in fears during a custodial interrogation.

1. In a business environment, the first two fears are relatively close. However, I have found that for the majority of employees, their greatest fear is embarrassment and what others will think of them. This is why it is so important that we give the subject the opportunity to save face. If you do everything else right, but fail to allow them to save face, you are very likely going to be dealing with denials. We must keep in mind that this fear reaches beyond the workplace to friends, family, church and community.

Common Fears

Prepare Like a Pro – 5 Things to Consider During Investigatory Prep Practices

First and foremost, the fact that there appears to be somewhat of a “line in the sand” between the Human Resources and the Security Divisions is many things including sad, unnecessary, archaic, wasteful and wrong.  Both divisions are equally important.  Both divisions play an important and necessary role in the success of any organization, so  both divisions must be on the same team for organizations to succeed.  The one thing I’ve noticed more than anything is what they seem to have in common:  a feeling that tenure inside their respective departments replaces the need for a thorough investigatory prep process (long before speaking to victims, witnesses and suspects).  After a speaking engagement at another SHRM conference recently, we were asked to put together a Webinar that focuses on this critical topic, as well as utilize this as the next Blog topic.  Well, mission accomplished on both fronts.  There are so many things to consider prior to an actual investigatory interview, but let’s start with just five…….

1 – What resources can I use to learn who my subject is?  Professional investigators understand that the more they know about the person with whom they are about to have a conversation, the better chance they have of painting a picture as to what potentially caused the act in question to take place.

Brett’s Things to Consider

IAI’s Nashville Elite Training Day

IAI’s Nashville Elite Training Day provided a number of “Aha” moments within the packed house of attendees.  But really, would you expect anything less from the Elite Training Day?  It all started with the unveiling of the new IAI logo: a strong futuristic logo for a strong and future thinking organization.

Elite Training Day Content

Our speakers provided great content that can be used immediately upon leaving the event.  And from what I saw, some of the content was being used during the event itself. I actually observed a few attendees run outside to call corporate to have them move on some of the items mentioned in the training.

curious about what happened at Elite Training Day

Four Tips to a Solid Statement

The investigative and accusatory interview can be steeped with challenges throughout the process. One of the most difficult and tedious of those challenges is obtaining a solid written statement from your suspect following their interview; the anticlimactic conclusion to the zenith of your investigation.

In my years of working with WZ and spending time with the Directors and VPs around the world, there seems to be a common thread when asked about specific training needs for their investigative staff. Part of that common thread is the need to obtain better statements from their suspects following the interview process.

Here are four simple tips that can help you to get more substance from the statements you obtain from your suspect:
Click here to read the four simple tips

Complacent? Not IAI Members…

Hey everyone!

Chris, Chris Norris here…I just wanted to say I had a great time hosting the IAI Webinar “Guarding Against Complacency” yesterday with more than 200 people attending. What a great turnout from the IAI community!! I also wanted to pass along a very special “thanks” to InstaKey for sponsoring the training event! Don’t forget to check out InstaKey’s new blog: Access Intelligence.

During the Webinar we discussed some key points regarding rationalizations, ORC interviews and writing effective reports. Even Dave Zulawski made a special guest appearance! Thank you Dave. We hope everyone found some value in the Webinar and had some key take-aways from the training.

Click here to read more from Chris